Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

ART C121 Guide: Citing Images

A resource guide for Art 121: Drawing I

Finding Image Citation Information

Wikimedia Image ScreenshotWhen using images in your research, you will likely need to cite them. Although this can be difficult in the internet age, you should make some effort to track down the original image, or use only images whose source you can find. There are many image collections online that provide the information needed to cite the image.

Wikimedia, for example, often provides a summary with its images. The information included in this summary is often referred to as metadata.

In this example, the file name is also the name of the portrait. The metadata includes the artist, title, and date, which will help when citing the picture.

Wikimedia Summary ScreenshotIt also includes licensing information, which is necessary when determining whether or not you can use the image in a project.

Note that sites like Wikimedia are collaborative, and can be changed by individuals who are not experts in the field, so always verify information when needed.

Citation for this image in APA:

Rossetti, D. G. (Artist). (1865). Portrait of Shakespeare [digital image]. Wikimedia Commons. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Portrait_of_Shakespeare_(Rossetti,_c.1865).jpg

 

Citation for this image in MLA:

Rossetti, Dante Gabriel. Portrait of Shakespeare. 1865, Wikimedia Commons, commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Portrait_of_Shakespeare_(Rossetti,_c.1865).jpg

 

Citing Images in APA

Most images will use the following APA citation format:

Author, A. A. (Role of Author). (Date). Title of Image [type of image]. Website Name. http://website.org/url/

If the image does not have a creator, you can use the following format.

Title of image [type of image]. (Date). Website Name. http://website.org/url/

 

Note: In the case of most images you find online, cite the type of image as [digital image]. Only use [photograph] or [painting] if you are referencing a physical piece of art you could hold in your hands (even if you aren't allowed to touch it). If the image is viewed in person, use the location instead of the website or book title. For example: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles.

Citing Images in MLA

Most images will use the following MLA citation format:

Artist Last Name, First Name. Title of Image. Date of Artwork. Website Name, website.org/url/
Artist Last Name, First Name. Title of Image. Date of Artwork. Book Title, by Book Author Name, Publisher, Publication Date, p.#.

If the image does not have a creator, you can use the following format.

Title of Image. Date of Artwork. Website Name, website.org/url/

 

Note: If the image is viewed in person, use the location instead of the website or book title. For example: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles.